allowthem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If the sky comes falling down, for you, there’s nothing in this world I wouldn’t do.

Well thank you Avcii. Of course this is an empty promiss. The sky does not fall down. So ad implicatio there are things in the world he would not do. If you make a statement with IF, followed by something that will never ever happen, you can insert any promiss after that. This points to the Principle of Explosion.

It is a Dutch saying: If the sky comes falling down, we all wear a blue hat. Of course not many people wear a blue hat. But then the sky did not fall down either. But if it would… boy.. It would be a dream world wherein everything is possible. It points to a logical rule that is discovered in the Middle Ages that is well known under its acronym EFSQ: Ex falso sequitur quod libet

Logically, this sounds a lot less musical:

p \and \neg p \vdash q

P is any statement. ¬p is it’s negation. Something can be and also not be. But that cannot be. This follows from the classical logical law from Aristoteles, that is referred to as the law of non contradiction. Things cannot be and not be. They either are or they are not.

So if things are and are not, everything goes. if a contradiction is true; all things are possible. Because things cannot be and not be. And if they can, then anything goes. Because they can’t. This is called the explosion principle. If that is true, than heaven exists, it comes falling down, we all wear blue hats and avcii would do anything.

You do not have to necessarily agree with the explosion principle. Trivialists don´t. They reject the non-contradictory principle. This is much to the dismay of some philosophers. In the words of Avicenna:  a Persian philosopher: “Anyone who denies the law of non-contradiction should be beaten and burned until he admits that to be beaten is not the same as not to be beaten, and to be burned is not the same as not to be burned.”

Keep that in mind, when admitting you are a trivialist. This should best be kept secret. I guess there are a lot of closet trivialists out there. They are a severely suppressed minority. The Dutch author Harry Mulish admitted to be one and was subsequently ridiculed. Of course when you are a trivialist, you may as well discover heaven. In Mulish´ later work, he appeared to discover heaven. It is a very nice book. It kept my oven levelled for ten years.